Earth 12000: Exploring space, time, and parallel universes

July 03 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Other   Year: General   Rating: 9 Hot

A glance at what life may be like ten millennia from now, by Dick Pelletier

Of course, nobody can predict exactly how the future will unfold in 10,000 years, but by tracking technology advances expected in the coming centuries, we see changes that will transform humanity into super-intelligent beings focused on developing space, exploring universes, and traveling through time.

Imagine if you could peek in on the dinosaurs’ first-hand, enjoy an exotic vacation thousands of light years from Earth, or jump into a parallel universe where another you is living a far more exciting life than yours – and you could stay there if you like.

For years, scientists around the world have bandied about the revolutionary idea that future humans could zip across the universe using wormholes as high-speed portals enabling faster-than-light travel to explore space, enter other universes, and witness the past and future.

Wormholes enable travel between its two openings. One end of the wormhole stays home while the other is carted away at sub-light velocities to the destination, connecting the two locations through a tunnel in warped space-time. A person enters the wormhole, and depending on the connection, exits to a remote destination in space, another time in the past or future, or into a parallel universe.

Consensus among most scientists has been that wormholes are so destructive; people would be torn to subatomic bits if they tried such a thing. However, a new paper by University of Utah physicist Lior Burko now raises the possibility that wormholes may not annihilate all matter, and the potential for hyperspace travel could one day be realized. (cont.)

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Scientists love time-travel fantasy too; for real

July 31 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Other   Year: General   Rating: 7 Hot

By Dick Pelletier

Movies like Time Machine, Back to the Future, Terminator, and “One Moment in Time”: bring out the little child inside us. We love to fantasize about going back in time to see what might have been, or to alter some predicament in our life. Scientists get excited over this fantasy too – some even believe we can turn this fictional genre into reality.

Einstein stated that people traveling at near light speeds would age more slowly than those remaining stationary. Inhabitants of a fast-moving spaceship would experience forward time travel. And if traveling faster than light, they would go backwards in time.

Atomic clocks flown in space proved Einstein correct, and many top physicists now express views that time travel could someday become possible.

Cal-Tech’s Kip Thorne was the first to publish a scientific paper with the words “time machine” in the title. Thorne worried that reporters might ballyhoo the article causing colleagues to ignore it – but instead, his work brought other scientists out in the open.

World famous physicist Stephen Hawking, Cosmologist Igor Novikov, and others began publicly debating the pros and cons of time travel.

Thorne focused on the actual time machine. He suggests that if we create a wormhole, accelerate one end to nearly the speed of light and bring it back, we would have a time machine. We could enter the machine and travel to both past and future.

But a recent Better Humans article suggests our frail bodies could not stand up to wormhole pressures. Solution: upload our mind and travel as information; then reassemble on arrival using nanotechnology.

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